719 Wall Street

 

Architecture:

    Style:                        Folk House

    Description:              This is a two-story wood frame structure with cement shingle siding and concrete coated cut stone foundation.  In front of the side wing is a porch with a shed roof and square wood posts on a concrete pad.  On the end is a one-story semi-hexagonal bay.

 

Significant Period:

    Construction Date:     circa 1870’s

    Architect/Builder:       Unknown

    Context:                    Chester Kinney paid taxes on this property valued at $500 in 1877, indicating a house was there.  He resided elsewhere.  The first documented resident was Lewis Potts, listed as a capitalist in the 1888 City Directory.  His widow resided there in 1893.  George Glass, a mill foreman for the Howard Estate, lived there from 1901 to 1902.  Fred Davis, salesman for the Patterson Music Company, lived there with his wife Myrtle from 1904 to 1906.  George and Olive Langtry along with Henry and Loretta Bennett lived there in 1909.  Harry Graham, who worked at E-M-F Company, lived there in 1910 with his wife Caroline.  Andrew Wilson, a commercial traveler, lived there with his wife Bertha from 1912 to 1916.  Mrs. Caroline Graham lived with them first, then William Thompson, a brakeman for Grand Trunk Railway, and his wife Anna.  Joseph Toth, motorman for DUR, and his wife Elizabeth lived there in 1918.  Charles Fountain, employed by P M Railway, and his wife Annie lived there in 1919.  Albert O’Brien, a welder, lived there with his wife Viola from 1920 to 1921.  William Sanderson, a carpenter, lived there with his wife Emily in 1921 also.  Margaret Edwards, a waitress at C of C Restaurant, lived there in the mid 1920s.  Alex Cole, a mechanic and music teacher, lived there with his wife Margaret in 1930.  Leo Miley, driver for CRT, lived there with his wife Phoebe in 1933.  Margaret Mackenzie lived there in the late 1930s.  At the same time, Charles Nicholson, employed by Mueller Brass, lived there with his wife Grace in 1936-37.  Conrad Schwitzke, employed at the Government Building, lived there in 1938-39.