726-728 Court Street

 

Architecture:

    Style:                        Italianate          

    Description:              It is asymmetrical with a brick foundation and wood clapboard siding.  The main structure is a two-story square with a hipped roof.  To the east is a one-story side gabled wing with a front porch, to the rear a two-story wing.  Decorative elements include double brackets in the roof eave, single brackets in the porch eave, patterned pediments over the first story windows, and an off center entry with side lights, transom, and a highly ornamental pediment.  This house was briefly shown in Bob Villa’s “Restore America” television program.

 

Significant Period:

    Construction Date:     circa 1870’s

    Architect/Builder:       Unknown

    Context:                    The James J. Boyce family lived there from 1873 until 1901.  In 1873 James Boyce and Jacob Haynes founded the private banking house of J. J. Boyce & Co.  James eventually became sole owner.  In 1883 the business was reportedly located at the southeast corner of Military and Water streets.  James died in 1905.  The business was then run under Hubert, then Maurice Boyce until it was dissolved in 1911.  James children lived with him long after they reached adulthood.  Hubert and John rose from clerks at J.J. Boyce & Company.  Arthur was a clerk for the Post Office, then worked for Carson & Boyce real estate.  Maurice was a clerk for Patterson & McTaggart.  At times a domestic also lived with them.  The home was vacant in 1902, then occupied by Frank Murphy in 1904, Edwin Petit in 1906, then was vacant again in 1907.  The Joseph P. and Harriet B. Minnie family lived there from 1910 to about 1933.  Joseph held a number of jobs over the years: bookkeeper of B I shops, retiree, meter reader Port Huron Gas & Electric Co., and telegraph operator at Grand Trunk railway.  The 1923-24 City Directory first listed the house with two addresses, 726 and 728, with Mrs. Carrie E. Petit as the other occupant.  She was the widow of Edwin S. Petit, likely the earlier resident in 1906.